James Daniell

 

PhD StudentJames Daniell

Bioinformatics Laboratory, Centre for Genomics and Proteomics

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INTERESTS

  • Systems Biology
  • Synthetic Biology
  • Bioinformatics
  • Industrial Biotechnology
  • Biofuels
  • PROJECT

    We are creating genome-scale metabolic models to engineer and optimise the proprietary LanzaTech microbial platform. This involves both computational biology and wet laboratory research. As well as finding targets for metabolic engineering to improve fermentation productivity, this project includes a systems level exploration of the integration of metabolic pathways for the production of other high-value chemicals.

    Metabolic Modelling

    Researchers have modelled biological systems mathematically for over a century, starting with enzyme kinetics and population growth. However, it has only been during the past fifteen years that entire organisms have been reconstructed and the past eight years that these models have been able to be used in a predictive manner. Genome-scale metabolic modelling is an emerging interdisciplinary field which uses a systems-level view of an organism to capture the genotype-phenotype relationship, and predict phenotypic behaviour.

    LanzaTech

    LanzaTech is a clean-tech company which is developing a fermentation process that uses proprietary bacteria to produce high-value chemicals from a range of feedstocks including industrial flue gases. The current primary application of this technology is the production of ethanol from carbon monoxide.

    LINKS

  • LanzaTech
  • Centre for Genomics and Proteomics
  • Bioinformatics Institute
  • LinkedIn

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